Book Review: Soul Hunter

Soul Hunter by Aaron Dembski-Bowden

Aaron Dembski-Bowden is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors. He has an incredible ability to draw the reader in to complex scenarios without getting bogged down on unimportant details while maintaining a rich atmosphere and intriguing characters, even when they are destined to die a chapter into their introduction. The other book I’ve read by him is Helsreach and, as with Soul Hunter, I had trouble putting it down. Read more of this post

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Book Review: The Horus Heresy – Books 1 through 5

HappyDD was kind enough to send along his review of the first five novels in The Horus Heresy series:

Throughout this review I am going to use a lot of jargon from the 40K universe without defining it, as it would be too laborious to define everything. This is intended to be read by those with a passing familiarity with the universe.

The first five books of The Horus Heresy series by Black Library are part of an indefinite series that currently stands at 50,000 books (ok, so it’s currently at a book 18 being published in January 2012, but damn this is a long series). Read more of this post

Book Review: Storm of Iron


Storm of Iron
by Graham McNeill

What I liked:

  • The characters are believable and appropriately developed.
  • There are various Imperial groups represented in the story and they interact with each other appropriately. While some groups are more secretive, elite, or bound to protocol than others they still support each other and show mutual respect because they all fight for the Emperor. This is lacking in other stories where you wonder how anything in Imperium is accomplished at all.
  • Excellent job of portraying the power struggle that Chaos characters are faced with and how they deal with it differently. I would have preferred more of the political maneuvering but it may not have been suited to the pace of the book.
  • Multiple sub-plots that serve the main plot well and intertwine believably.
  • Unpredictable twists and betrayals.

What I didn’t like:

  • My only gripe with the book is that some of the combat was a bit too drawn out for my own taste. It’s something that I struggle with in many books about warfare but I suppose it is appropriate given the subject matter. I heard it referred to as war porn once and that sounded like a great name for it. That said, it’s not over board in this book and it didn’t tarnish my opinion of the story.

Conclusion:
I had heard and read a lot of good things about the book before picking it up, so my expectations were high. I wasn’t disappointed and definitely recommend giving it a read. That said, I typically assume that I shouldn’t be expecting a mind blowing read for anything associated with a saga or ‘world’, such as Dragon Lance or Warhammer 40k, so take that for what it’s worth. As these sorts of novels go I thoroughly enjoy Storm of Iron and can see myself reading it again at some point. This was the first novel by Graham McNeill that I’ve read and I’m looking forward to reading his other books in the future.